Course Descriptions

PDF Version: Course Descriptions

ENGLISH

Introduction to Literature and Composition
(Fall Term – 9th grade)
This year-long course combines grammar, writing, and reading and provides students with foundational skills in high school English. The fall course focuses on grammar, usage, sentence crafting and paragraphs. The objectives of the course are to comprehend the fundamentals of English grammar, usage and syntax; write grammatically correct phrases, clauses, and sentences applying the skills and knowledge learned in class; diagram sentences in English using a standard diagramming method; read and discuss selected readings in fiction and poetry; write about literature using a formal academic style and proper paragraph structure.

Introduction to Literature and Composition
(Spring Term – 9th grade)
In the spring, we introduce students to the academic study of literature and formal essays. Students read, annotate and analyze selected poems and short fiction, a major novel, and a major play. Students are introduced to formal expository writing style, paragraph structure, and citation techniques. The work during the spring term course builds on the fall semester’s grammar course and covers topics such as sentence crafting, editing, revision, and mechanics. Students write high school-level, word-processed English compositions of three to five paragraphs.

Literature and American Identity
(Fall Term – 10th grade)
The purpose of this course is to explore the complexity of the term “American identity” by critically reading representative texts of American Literature and respond to these texts in both creative and analytical ways. Ralph Waldo Emerson’s and Henry David Thoreau’s words illustrate American Romanticism. Walt Whitman’s and Emily Dickinson’s poetry portray the antebellum period. The works of Frederick Douglass, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Charles Chesnutt represent the complexities of the African American experience. Ernest Hemingway’s In Our Time takes the students into the Modern age, and Maxine Hong Kingston’s and Bharati Mukherjee’s words portray the immigrant experience of the post modern era.

Romanticism to Modernism in Western European Literature
(Spring Term – 10th grade)
The purpose of this course is to explore the literary movements which dominated Western Europe from 1750 – 1950. The students will read critically representative texts from the Romantic, Realist and Modern periods and respond to these texts in both creative and analytic composition. They will begin by reading poems from Songs of Innocence and Experience by William Blake, “Ode to a Nightingale,” by John Keats, and “Mont Blanc,” by Percy Bysshe Shelley. Portraying sentiments of Realism are several short stories: A Piece of String and The Necklace by Guy de Maupassant, “A Problem,” and “The Lady with the Dog,” by Anton Chekhov. And as the course moves on to the modern era students read The Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka, “The Legacy,” by Virginia Woolf, and “Araby,” by James Joyce.

AP English Literature
(Fall and Spring Terms – 11th grade)
Welcome to Advanced Placement English! In this course juniors at HS MSE will study some of the greatest works of imaginative literature written over the last seven centuries. As the Italian novelist Italo Calvino observed, great works of literature seem to continuously want to tell us something. In this class we will explore how major works of literature express important ideas and provide those of us who carefully read them insights into our world and our lives. This is a college-level English course – and it is also designed to prepare students for the AP examination. The reading curriculum is sub-divided into two thematically connected units. Each reading unit includes long and short fiction, drama, poetry, critical essays and a range of writing assignments at the college level. The two major thematic units are: (1) Love, Conflict, and Betrayal (2) Alienation and Rebellion.

Academic Writing
(Fall Term — 12th grade)
In the “Academic Writing” class students learn to write a college-level academic paper by following Harvard University’s written essay guidelines. The course incorporates a study of critical essays across the curriculum. These essays serve as models for students as they develop an understanding of the form, techniques, and structure of an academic essay. Students will then select a topic for reading and research within the disciplines of the humanities (i.e. literature, history, philosophy, art history, etc.) Class work provides students with diverse opportunities to study, share ideas, research, and draft their papers.

Existentialism
(Spring Term — 12th grade)
The purpose of this course is to explore the driving ideas of existentialism. It is also to identify the tensions among several existentialists and examine the core of their disagreements. Through the works of Jean Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Samuel Beckett, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky, students will study and critique questions concerning individualism, freedom, and choice. The evolution of ideas from a modern to a post-modern era will serve as a background to some of the concepts that we will explore.

American Short Story
(Spring Term — 12th grade)
In “The American Short Story” students read, discuss, analyze, and write about a collection of short stories by leading American authors. The course includes stories by Sherwood Anderson, Edith Wharton, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Flannery O’Connor, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and many more. Students are expected to engage in close readings of the texts; identify key components of short stories; write short critical paragraphs in response to their reading; and write essays where they demonstrate their ability to comprehend, analyze, and critique a short story.

Politics and the American Novel
(Spring Term — 12th grade)
In “Politics and the American Novel” students read, discuss, analyze, and write about a collection of novels by leading American authors. The course includes the following novels: The Awakening, by Kate Chopin, The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway, The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison. Students will identify emerging themes and tensions in the context of political and cultural events. Students will also read a selection of critical essays. Students are expected to engage in close readings of the texts, identify key components of the novels, write short critical paragraphs in response to their reading, and write essays that demonstrate their ability to comprehend, analyze and critique a novel.

Origins of the African American Novel
(Spring Term — 12th grade)
The purpose of the course is to examine the origins of the African American novel. The students will read and enjoy the writings of leading African American authors. They will read Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston; The Color Purple, by Alice Walker; Native Son, by Richard Wright; and Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison. Students will also read essays by Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alice Walker, Shelby Steele, and more. The students will explore the historical and political challenges of African American authors. They will review some of the political issues involved in the study of African American literature. Students will also examine the place of Black Vernacular English in the African American tradition.

ENGLISH Electives 
Writing Poetry
What does a flea have to do with premarital sex? What is “thicker than forget”? What 15th century rhyme-master is Snoop Dogg most like? How do you spell “loneliness” without the alphabet? What competitive sport slams words instead of bodies? Take this course to know these answers while reading, writing, speaking, and breathing poetry. This is an elective interested in the experience of poetry and is for the student who prefers to explore poetry outside the context of a traditional English class.

Women in Literature
This elective explores how women have been portrayed in literature from the 19th to the 20th centuries. Students will read in class such major works of fiction as “The Awakening” (Chopin, K.) and “The Color Purple” (Walker, A.). Students will discuss their ideas and engage in creative assignments to deepen their understanding and appreciation of this literature. A variety of in-class activities, including the viewing of film, will make these stories enjoyable for students.

Science Fiction
The Science Fiction course explores the literary world of the science fiction. Science fiction serves the purpose of using one’s futuristic imagination to tackle ethical dilemmas. The “what if” situations and moral questions of the science fiction universe are designed to make modern humanity examine the consequences of our own day-to-day decisions.

Fantasy Genre
Free from any confines and therefore its best description can be that its content is only limited by human imagination. Fantasy differs from its cousin genre, science fiction, in that science fiction is often limited by the idea that its stories are supposed to be explained in the context of scientific truth. In other words, the phenomenon of a story in science fiction has to be qualified and justified through some type of scientific lens no matter how far-fetched it may be. Fantasy does not need any qualifications: a sorcerer may cast a spell; a character may teleport through time and space. This is possible simply because it is fantasy. This fantasy elective will explore classical and modern fantasy writing and visual media. Classical fantasy usually deals with romantic ideals of good and evil. The characters are often pure of heart one way or the other. Modern fantasy creates stories than tend to lean toward realism. In modern fantasy the hero may not always save the day-there may not even be a hero. Throughout this course both types of fantasy literature will be explored.

 

HISTORY

9th Grade World History AP
The course is based on a global perspective of the world and human interactions from 8000BCE to period 3 (600-1450), using the themes outlined in the AP World History Course Description. Students will refine their analytical abilities and critical thinking skills in order to understand historical and geographical context, make comparisons across cultures, use documents and other primary sources, and recognize and discuss different interpretations and historical frameworks. It involves intensive study of world cultures, paying special attention to change over time and comparing the effects of common phenomena on different cultures.

10th Grade World History AP
The course picks up where 9th grade material left off. It is based on a global perspective of the world and human interactions from period 4 (1450-1750) to the present day, using the themes outlined in the AP World History Course Description. Students will refine their analytical abilities and critical thinking skills in order to understand historical and geographical context, make comparisons across cultures, use documents and other primary sources, and recognize and discuss different interpretations and historical frameworks. It involves intensive study of world cultures, paying special attention to change over time and comparing the effects of common phenomena on different cultures.

11th Grade U.S. History
This year-long course, which ends in a New York State Regents Exam, covers the history of the United States from the colonial period through the present. Beyond the history content, students learn to read and critically analyze primary and secondary documents, find and assess historical sources, and write historical essays.

12th Grade Economics
The Economics course is a CCNY college credit bearing class. It is a semester-long overview of economics and financial literacy. The students are exposed to introductory microeconomic concepts such as opportunity cost, supply and demand, comparative advantage and production possibilities. They learn about personal finance, including savings, budgeting, credit, investing and insurance. Lastly, they are introduced to macroeconomic concepts such as GDP, unemployment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policy, and the state of the U.S. economy.

12th Grade Participation in Government
The Participation in Government course is a CCNY college credit bearing class that will introduce students to Federal, NY State, and NYC Government. Additionally, the Participation in Government course will require students to participate in debates and discussion of current events.

HISTORY Electives:
The Times They Are A-Changin’: America in the 1960s
This course will explore one of the most tumultuous decades in U.S. History. Whether protesting for civil rights in Selma or battling an elusive enemy in Vietnam, whether dancing in the mud at Woodstock or stepping on the surface of the moon, whether “joining up” or “dropping out,” Americans were forced to question who they were, what they stood for and what their role would be in a changing world.

Student Government/Leadership
In this course, students will focus on leadership skills and event planning. Topics covered will include proper execution and evaluation of events and fundraisers, proposal writing, group communication, ethics, and methods of persuasion. A leader is someone people choose to follow. Students learn to be leaders!

History through Film
Film can communicate copious information on a time period (the people, places and events) in ways written sources cannot duplicate. This course examines features films as historical evidence. Students will learn how to read films as cultural texts that help us better understand history and culture. They will identify point of view, juxtapose fact from fiction and extrapolate chief themes. Students will get the chance to hone a range of vocal skills through seminars, debates, in-depth discussions and other interactive activities. This course is suited for history enthusiasts rather than film buffs and is geared for 9th and 10th grade students as the films will pertain to events in world history.

 

LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH

German 1/2
German semester 1 and 2 students will learn to communicate in German on a variety of everyday topics: home and family, shopping and clothing, school, food, parties, and free time activities. This course is an introduction to speech patterns, writing, geography and cultures of German-speaking countries. Through comparisons and contrasts, students will develop greater insight into their own language and culture. From the first day of class, students are expected to participate fully in experimenting with the four modalities of language acquisition: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will frequently work in pairs or groups to practice comprehension skills. Their academic studies will be supported and complemented by a wide range of culturally focused learning activities using film, music, art, literature and cuisine.

German 3/4
German semester 3 and 4 students will build upon previous knowledge gained in German 1/2. They will continue to learn to communicate in German on a variety of everyday topics: family, household chores and obligations, health and diet, travel, school and social life, friends and self awareness. This course will develop understanding and mastery of speech patterns, writing, geography and cultures of German speaking countries. Through comparisons and contrasts, students will develop greater insight into their own language and culture. From the first day of class, students are expected to participate fully in experimenting with the four modalities of language acquisition: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will frequently work in pairs or groups to practice comprehension skills. Their academic studies will be supported and complemented by a wide range of culturally focused learning activities using film, music, art, literature and cuisine.

German 5/6
German Level 5/6 concludes with the LOTE Regents Examination in June. Students will continue to learn to communicate in German on a variety of everyday topics: life in the city, modes of transportation, travel, making reservations in a hotel, dining in a restaurant, going to the doctor or dentist and more. They will expand their vocabulary and review the conversational past (present perfect) tense. Additionally, students will master the narrative past (simple past), which is primarily used for writing. They will focus on all four modalities (reading, writing, listening, speaking) but dramatically improve their prepared and spontaneous speaking and listening abilities. Class will be conducted primarily in German. Their depth of cultural knowledge will increase as they are introduced to literature, geography and history across disciplines. In preparation for the Regents Examination, it is strongly suggested that students expect to stay after school occasionally for tutoring. This third year of German will culminate in reading and discussing a short novella in German.

AP German
Students enrolled in the AP German course will continue to reinforce vocabulary and grammatical concepts learned in previous years of German study. New vocabulary and advanced grammatical concepts will be introduced through a variety of topics and literary selections. Students will read selections by German authors, including: Der Sandmann by E.T.A. Hoffmann, short stories from the Trümmerliteartur of Wolfgang Borchert and Heinrich Böll. They will read historical novellas like Die Weisse Rose, about the brother and sister Hans and Sophie Scholl and their underground resistance to Hitler’s rise to power. Students will focus on the six major themes established by the AP College Board in order to be prepared to take the AP German exam in the Spring term. The year will culminate in a film unit featuring award winning German films, which will stimulate the students’ listening comprehension, writing and speaking skills.

Spanish Level 2
Spanish Level 2 is for people who have studied Spanish Level 1 in middle school. Spanish 2 is a review and more-in-depth study of the Spanish language. It is designed to provide students opportunities beyond those offered in Spanish 1. This course extends the essential elements to provide greater enrichment and creativity in writing and speaking skills. It utilizes high-level critical thinking and focuses on the development of intermediate proficiency in oral skills, comprehension of Spanish literature, history, culture, expository composition, and expands the use of grammar and vocabulary. Spanish 2 is preparation for Spanish 3 at the junior level, and introductory courses at the university level. Most institutions of higher learning require at least 2 consecutive years of a foreign language to meet admission requirements.

Spanish Level 3
Spanish Level 3 is for people who have studied Spanish Level 2 in school. Spanish 3 is a review and more-in-depth study of the Spanish language. It is designed to provide students with the necessary knowledge to pass the New York State’s Regents Examination. This course extends the elements to provide greater enrichment and creativity in writing and speaking skills. It utilizes high-level critical thinking and focuses on the development of proficiency in oral skills, comprehension of Spanish writings, culture, expository composition, and expands the use of grammar and vocabulary. Spanish 3 is preparation for Spanish 4 at the junior level, the Regents Examination, and/or introductory courses at the university level. Most institutions of higher learning require at least 2 consecutive years of a foreign language to meet admission requirements.

Spanish Level 4
The Spanish Level 4 course is a CCNY college credit bearing class. Spanish Level 4 is for people who have studied Spanish Level 3 in school. Spanish 3 is a review and more-in-depth study of the Spanish language. It is designed to provide students with the necessary knowledge to understand grammar and literature topics in Spanish, and to read and analyze classic literary texts. This course extends the elements to provide greater enrichment and creativity in writing and speaking skills. It utilizes high-level critical thinking and focuses on the development of proficiency in oral skills, comprehension of Spanish writings, culture, expository composition, and expands the use of grammar and vocabulary. Spanish 4 is readying students for language and literature courses at the university level. Two major works of literature: a novel, and a play by F. García Lorca, are read and analyzed in Spanish.

 

HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Health Education
Health Education is one of the most enlightening class sophomores will take in their high school career. We will reach deep into our toolbox to build our minds strong enough to deal with relevant health issues that directly impact our community. Active participation in class discussions is encouraged and will be a central part of the experience. Our units will include: Emotional, Mental and Social Health, Nutrition and Physical Activity, Tobacco, Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention, Violence and Injury Prevention, Abstinence and Sexual Health and HIV, STD and Pregnancy Prevention. Students must pass 1 credit of Health Education for their high school diploma.

Physical Education
Students must pass 7 credits of Physical Education to receive their high school diploma. We will cover a variety of sports skills and fitness concepts to provide all students with the confidence necessary to pursue a healthy lifestyle. Instruction will be provided in a developmentally appropriate manner to account for all skill levels. Specific Units will be taught to certain grade levels trying to cover an array of sports throughout their four years of high school. Units may include but are not limited to Softball, Tennis, Basketball, Flag Football, Team Handball, Ultimate Frisbee, Speedball, Dance & Movement, and Soccer.

HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION Elective:
Sports Journalism
In this course, students explore the worlds of both online and print sports journalism. Different sources will be analyzed. Students will create a portfolio of work including the creation of a blog. Extensive reading and writing will take place during the course to improve skills in this field.

 

MUSIC/ELECTIVES

Core Music
The course progresses with a concentration on great works of western music and Jazz. It is designed to have students put music into its historical and cultural context and make them aware of their musical heritage. The objective of the course is to encourage students to be avid listeners and gain an appreciation for western music and jazz. Students will become intelligent listeners and respond to music using the language of music. The course develops chronologically, examining great works from the medieval period up to the modern era. Students will be able to analyze these works, articulate their impressions, and think critically in response to music. All students must be able to believe that they can contribute to and be a part of music. With this in mind, students will remain motivated. Each student will be involved to the degree of his musical capacity to make him/her a more sensitive, discriminating, and creatively aware person. One chapter will be spent on performing media: voices and instruments. Students will be introduced to the instruments of the orchestra and will be able to identity their roles in composition and performance. In addition, students receive the opportunity to share their favorite genres among peers and everyone develops an appreciation for other popular genres that an appropriate recognition can be given to all artistic expressions which have contributed to present day culture. A term paper on the topic is required. Lastly, all students are trained in basic essentials of theory which can be applied to the playing of instruments: either in private study or the classical guitar class at school.

MUSIC Electives:
Band
Students will develop musicianship skills through theory, ear training, sight reading and dictation. The focus of new music will be varied but primarily jazz. Some efficiency on an orchestral instrument is required. Students must make themselves available for special school events.

Chorus/Musical Theater Workshop
There’s No Business Like Show Business. Students will progress through theatrical antics, honing in on their acting, singing and dancing skills. Screening required before acceptance. Bring your best talent, but singing is a must.

Classical Guitar
The purpose of this class is to acquire and improve your guitar skills and musicianship so that you can play guitar for your own personal pleasure or perform. Our goals are to have fun and learn and prepare for possible school events. We will learn all aspects of guitar musicianship. Students will mainly read tablature but may opt to read music if they are interested. Basic chords will be learned. We will learn music from various genres but mainly focus on flamenco and classical music. We will develop our musical skills and see it as mode of self-expression. The best performances will also be a part of talent shows, graduation ceremonies and other school events. All music will be distributed in class but students will also use computer sites to download sheet music and look at You-Tube videos. There are no fees due for this class. All students are graded by their performances in class, which is 40%. Class participation and collaboration are another 40%. The remaining 20% will consist of journals, homework, and attendance.

Miscellaneous Electives:
Gastronomy I
This is an academic course about the study of food. We will cover a range of topics from the detrimental effects of globalization on our food system and biodiversity to an understanding of sustainable farming, seasonal shopping, and locally produced food. Each week there will be required readings and written assignments to guide your study. This class is designed to teach you to have a greater respect for the natural cycle of life — an awareness of what, when, and where our earth produces – so you can make mindful choices about consuming food and preserving traditions.

Gastronomy II
In this course, we will continue to study principles and examples of sustainably and ethically produced food. We will also run taste workshops, cooking classes, visit farms and markets around the city and invite guests into the classroom to learn about food production, farming practices, agribusiness and policy. We will also explore healthy alternatives, food and travel writing, and some examples of food and culture. Prerequisite: Gastronomy I Mathematics, Science & Engineering Departments

 

MATHEMATICS

Algebra
(9th grade students, full year)
Students examine the structure of real numbers, algebraic expressions, and functions. The topics studied include linear equations, inequalities, functions and systems, quadratic equations and functions, polynomial expressions, data analysis, probability, and the elementary properties of functions. Mathematical modeling of real-life problems and problem solving are major themes of the course. The course ends with each student taking the New York State Regents Integrated Algebra Exam; however, students are challenged to master material beyond the standards set by the New York State Regents.

Geometry
(9th grade students, full year)
In this Freshman Geometry class students study plane and solid Euclidean geometry, two and three dimensional coordinate geometry, transformations, the nature of deductive proof, and beginning triangular trigonometry. The use of technology is integrated throughout the course. We will prepare students to exceed the Mathematics Performance Standards of New York City and New York State by following an intensive first-year geometry curriculum.

Foundations for Higher Mathematics (9th grade, full year), only for those students who have already passed their NYS Regents Exam in Algebra
To prepare students to exceed state requirements by following an intensive 1st year algebra curriculum
Topic Overview: Review adding, subtracting, multiplying expressions (i.e. first 8 lessons in algebra curriculum – emphasis on distributed expressions) Integers, rational numbers, irrational numbers; simplifying radical expressions Problem Solving: Consecutive integer, geometric problems, rate – time – distance problems, area problems (i.e. uniform border); AMC practice; PSAT/SAT problems (should be interspersed throughout the course) Exponents; Negative exponents; fractional exponents Factoring (emphasis on factoring by grouping and non quadratic type) Algebraic fractions, Mixed expressions (sect. 6-5, 6-6) Polynomial Long Division Equations with Fractional Coefficients (sect 7-3 and word problems) Rational Expressions Fractional Equations (sect 7-4 and word problems); Mixture, Investment, Work Problems (sect 7-7, 7-8) Maximum/Minimum word problems (i.e. quadratic equations) Common Errors (i.e. square of a binomial; square root of a sum of squares) Direct variation; Indirect variation; graph of hyperbola; what is an asymptote? Intro to conics Right triangle trigonometry Intro to Unit Circle; trig values of 30, 45, 60 degrees; Imaginary Numbers

Algebra 2/Trigonometry
(10th grade students)
Introduction to functions, rational expressions and their applications, rational exponents, conic sections, nonlinear systems of equations, intervals, inequalities, operations on functions, inverse functions, graphing polynomial and rational functions, binomial theorem, exponential and logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions and formulas.

Precalculus – One Semester
(11th grade students)
Intervals, inequalities, operations on functions, inverse functions, graphing polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and formulas. Upon successful completion, students will receive 3 college credits through CCNY.

Precalculus – Full year
(11th grade)
This course covers the same topics as Precalculus – One Semester, but at a pace to cover the material over an entire academic year. Intervals, inequalities, operations on functions, inverse functions, graphing polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and formulas. Students do not receive college credits upon successful completion for this course.

Calculus I – One Semester
(11th grade)
Students are introduced to the following topics: Limits, derivatives, rules of differentiation, trigonometric functions and their derivatives, differentials, graph sketching, maximum and minimum problems, related rates, antidifferentiation, Riemann sums, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and techniques of substitution in integrals. Upon successful completion, students will receive 3 college credits through CCNY.

Calculus I – Full year
(12th grade)
This course covers the same topics as Calculus I – One Semester, but at a pace to cover the material over an entire academic year. Topics include: limits, derivatives, rules of differentiation, trigonometric functions and their derivatives, differentials, graph sketching, maximum and minimum problems, related rates, antidifferentiation, Riemann sums, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and techniques of substitution in integrals. Students do not receive college credits upon successful completion for this course.

AP Calculus, B/C
(12th grade, full year)
Calculus BC is equivalent to a two semester college course in Calculus. This course is intended to prepare students to take the AP Calculus BC exam. As such, the curriculum of this course follows the recommendations of the College Board for a university level, introductory Calculus course. This course will address: Pre-requisites for Calculus, Limits and Continuity, Derivatives, Applications of Derivatives, Integration, Differential equations and Modeling, Applications of Integration, Sequences, L’Hopital’s Rule and Improper integrals, Infinite series, Parametric, Vector, and Polar Functions

AP Statistics
(12th grade, full year)
This course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: • Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns • Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study • Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses

 

SCIENCE

Biology
(9th grade, full year)
This course begins to prepare students for careers in health care, environmental science, and science research. And it develops intellectual power, joy, and reverence for life.

Biology Lab
(9th grade, full year)
Students hone their skills of observation, questioning, designing and conducting investigations and experiments, and writing concise but insightful reports. Topics coincide with those in Biology class.

Chemistry
(10th grade students, full year)
Introduction to Chemistry, Matter and Change, Scientific Measurement, Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table, Nuclear Chemistry, Electrons in Atoms, Chemical Periodicity, Ionic Bonding and Ionic Compounds, Ionic Bonding and Ionic Compounds, Covalent Bonding, States of Matter, The Behavior of Gases, Thermochemistry, Chemical Names and Formulas Water and Aqueous Systems, Chemical Names and Formulas, Chemical Quantities, Chemical Reactions, Stoichiometry, Solutions, Reaction Rates and Equilibrium, Acids and Bases Neutralization, Oxidation-Reduction Reactions, Electrochemistry, Hydrocarbon Compounds, Functional Groups and Organic Reactions

Chemistry Lab
(10th grade, full year)
Students hone their skills of observation, questioning, designing and conducting investigations and experiments, and writing concise but insightful reports. Topics coincide with those in Chemistry class.

Regents Physics
(11th grade, full year)
In Regents Physics, students conduct laboratory investigations, use scientific methods, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study topics including: laws of motion; changes within physical systems and conservation of energy and momentum; force; electricity and magnetism; characteristics and behavior of waves; and modern physics. This course provides students with a conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical and scientific skills. You will be taking the Physics Regents Exam in June. In order to be eligible to take the New York Regents Physics Exam you MUST have satisfactorily completed your physics lab class.

Physics Laboratory
(11th grade, full year)
Course Outline: This practical laboratory course supplements the full-year physics course, and includes lab experiments in the following topics: Scientific method, measurement, forces and motion, gravitation, energy, electricity, waves and light, and an introduction to quantum physics. This course satisfies the New York State Regents Physics laboratory requirement In Regents Physics, students conduct laboratory investigations, use scientific methods, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study topics including: laws of motion; changes within physical systems and conservation of energy and momentum; force; electricity and magnetism; characteristics and behavior of waves; and modern physics. This course provides students with a conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical and scientific skills. You will be taking the Physics Regents Exam in June. In order to be eligible to take the New York Regents Physics Exam you MUST have satisfactorily completed your physics lab class

SENIOR YEAR SCIENCE ELECTIVES (Demand Dependent)
Advanced Biology
(12th grade, full year)
This is a lab-based 12th grade course, emphasizing problem-based learning. Often working in teams, we tackle cases drawn from real life, for example, an oil spill, endangered species, biochemical pathways, experimental evolution in Drosophila, even simulated medical cases.

AP Chemistry
(12th grade, full year)
Introduction to Chemistry, Atoms, Molecules and Ions, Stoichiometry, Aqueous Reactions and Solution Stoich, Thermochemistry, Electronic Structure of Atoms, Chemical Periodicity, Bonding, Molecular Geometry & Bonding Theories, Gases, Intermolecular Forces, Liquids & Solids, Properties of Solutions, Nuclear Chemistry, Organic Chemistry

Advanced Physics
(12th grade, full year)
This course follows a standard college-level, calculus-based physics syllabus as preparation for coursework in science and engineering. The course covers topics in mechanics, including: Forces and motion, rotational motion and equilibrium, gravitation, work and energy, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics. In addition, the course will include a college-level laboratory sequence according to guidelines established by the Physics Department at City College. This course is intended to prepare students for success in pre-engineering college physics, and will mainly emphasize the development of advanced problem-solving skills. The course will build upon skills and concepts from Regents physics, but will require the use of basic calculus as a tool for understanding the fundamental laws of physics. A special focus will be placed on the advanced use of vector diagrams, trigonometric relations, and detailed algebra as tools for solving complex, multiple-step problems that are common to many fields of engineering and science.

 

ENGINEERING

Design and Drawing for Production
(9th grade students)
This course is based project work and systematic instruction can be seen as providing complementary learning opportunities. Students will know how to use a skill but also when to use it. They will learn to recognize, for themselves, the contexts in which a skill might be useful and what purposes it most appropriately will serve. In step-by-step systematic instruction, students will acquire the skills they need and then apply those skills in meaningful contexts by solving problems posed in projects. Through projects, students demonstrate mastered skills and knowledge, rather than parroting phrases or concepts on short answer, multiple choice, and true/false sets of evaluations. For this reason, authentic assessment is a viable option. This assessment can take the form of structured observations, checklists, rubrics, and portfolios to match the activities the students use to demonstrate content mastery.

Civil Engineering and Architecture
(10th Grade)
The major focus of the Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA) course is a long-term project that involves the design of a building and the development of a local property site. As students learn about architecture and design, they apply what they learn to small scale projects focusing on freehand drawing, mechanical drawing, site planning, architecture history, principles and elements of design, design process, model making, computer assisted design, portfolio development, presentation skills and designing using architectural concepts. The course is designed to prepare the students for college level work.

Digital Electronics
(11th grade, full year)
Students will design circuits and simulate them, they will also complete their education and build, test and troubleshoot their designs, demonstrating them to their instructor(s) as finished, documented products. These final steps, missing from many of today’s colleges, help our students make the connections between the designs on paper, where everything works, to the cyberworld of simulations, where everything can be made to work, to having a working product in the real world, where we all live. In addition to establishing connections between these three worlds, our students have confidence and experience – they know they can build what they design, or have a good enough documentation package that someone else can build it for them. This course follows a standard college-level, calculus-based physics syllabus as preparation for coursework in science and engineering. The course covers topics in mechanics, including: Forces and motion, rotational motion and equilibrium, gravitation, work and energy, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics. In addition, the course will include a college-level laboratory sequence according to guidelines established by the Physics Department at City College.

Principles Of Engineering
(11th grade, full year)
Engineers apply scientific principles to solve human problems. They do so with restricted resources, a tight schedule, and a limited amount of information about the problem. The Principles Of Engineering (POE) course exposes students to long-term engineering projects of a scale and complexity that although seems daunting at first, is within their reach, and assesses both their process and their final product. The projects are chosen to expose the students to wide range of engineering fields, and a variety of methods and materials. Most work is done in groups, as professional engineering is, and applies the principles learned in previous engineering courses. POE also provides opportunities to connect with CCNY Grove School of Engineering students and faculty. Each year, they visit the classroom for three weeks to present lessons on Chemical Engineering topics and to lead a design project.

SENIOR ENGINEERING ELECTIVES (Demand Dependent)
Innovator’s Workshop
(12th grade, full year)
This course is based project work and systematic instruction can be seen as providing complementary learning opportunities. Students will know how to use a skill but also when to use it. They will learn to recognize, for themselves, the contexts in which a skill might be useful and what purposes it most appropriately will serve. In step-by-step systematic instruction, students will acquire the skills they need and then apply those skills in meaningful contexts by solving problems posed in projects. Through projects, students demonstrate mastered skills and knowledge, rather than parroting phrases or concepts on short answer, multiple choice, and true/false sets of evaluations. For this reason, authentic assessment is a viable option. This assessment can take the form of structured observations, checklists, rubrics, and portfolios to match the activities the students use to demonstrate content mastery.

Advanced Architecture
(12th grade, full year)
The Advanced Architecture 1 course continues the focus of the Architecture 1 course in terms of creating designs that deals specifically with architectural concepts and by developing advanced techniques in freehand drawing, model making, presentation drawings and computer assisted design. The course focuses on urban design issues as it relates to exploring a full range of neighborhood conditions. We will explore the design of New York City in terms of historical context of the past century and how we can develop designs that address the future needs of the city population in terms of site, program, infrastructure, form-mass and sustainability. The readings further allow for classroom debates and a way of comparing urban design ideas and the built environment. The final semester project is part of the international competition sponsored by Emerging New York Architects (ENYA) and the Center for Architecture Foundation developed for high school students. The project culminates with a juried presentation and exhibition at the Center for Architecture Foundation.

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